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Dreaming by the Sea

Spending a night at the seashore — in a temporary shelter — is a well-established activity in the Islands. Early Hawaiian fishermen often took refuge from the weather in caves and bluff outcroppings close to the sea. Archaeological investigations have turned up wooden fishhooks and marine artifacts in lava tubes that had been occupied as fisherman’s shelters dating back to about 1250. Along the coastal Kings Highway, which is built over the old Ma ̄malahoa Trail in Kona, C-shaped stone break-walls still stand where early travelers took shelter against prevailing winds.

Intrepid visitors to the Islands during the nineteenth century spent many nights under the stars. Isabella Bird, writing about her journeys in the Hawaiian Archipelago, described blankets and tent gear used in transiting the Big Island. Less than fifty years later, Jack London wrote about camping on Maui “in a small grove of ‘o ̄lapa and ko ̄lea trees.”

In modern times, camping-out takes on a recreational seaside flavor. Boating, snorkeling, surfing, fishing and swimming are the main daytime activities; by evening, there’s barbequing and socializing. State, County and National parks draw thousands to Hawai‘i’s shore every year. On O‘ahu alone, there are seventeen campgrounds offering 225 campsites for up to five days, by permit. These outdoor recreational areas are fundamental to preserving Hawai‘i’s ocean-based traditions — they are some of the most beautiful places in the Aloha State where people connect with their sea-going heritage.

Please join with Young Brothers, Limited and Foss Hawai‘i as we journey to some of the most spectacular camping spots in the Islands. The images in our 2016 calendar highlight well-known beach gathering centers, as well as far-flung getaways where only the sound of the surf lulls you to sleep.




Download the full 2016 Tide Calendar